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Interactive Reading: How? 53 Tips [Checklist]

Interactive Reading: How? 53 Tips [Checklist]

Interactive reading to toddlers: an important skill to contribute to children’s language development. Here you will find an explanation and 53 reading tips for each phase of a story. Read on for these tips about reading to (young) children.

Interactive reading in practice: all 53 tips to try with toddlers now

Part 1 – If you are not reading to your own child, for example for a foreign family

interactive reading

  • Over time, you have to take fewer and fewer books with you so that the parents get more and more independent books from the library, until they do it completely.
  • Encourage the parents of your reading child to borrow books.
  • Have the parents participate in the reading in any way.
  • Ask the parents if there is already reading. What does the child like?
  • Parents always participate.
  • The book is in line with the interests of the child. Ask the interests of the parents.
  • Show the books to the parents.

Part 2 – Introduce the book

interactive reading

  • The book is still in the bag. Let the children guess what the book is about. For example: it is about an animal…, the animal has 4 legs…, the animal calls meow.
    “Hokus Pokus Pilatus Pas… I wish there was a cat book in the bag…” Then have the child take the book out.
  • Bring several books and let the child choose.
  • Discuss cover and title. ‘What do you think will happen, what do you think the story will be about?
    Well, shall we go and see? ‘
  • What do you already know about {this topic}?
  • Enter a listening question: ‘In the book 3 balls will appear in a minute, what colors are they? Pay attention!’
  • Start as soon as possible, especially with a busy group.

Part 3 – Know the little techniques of reading aloud

interactive reading

  • Let the child choose the book.
  • Look at the child regularly while reading.
  • Let the child watch the book.
  • Participate, for example roar if the main character does too.
  • Gestures and portraying.
  • Using different voices. A good example are the voices of Sesame Street.
  • Have the child read to you too.
  • Listening Response: Do not immediately respond verbally to a comment. For example just raising eyebrows, “mmmm, oh?”
  • Make a cardboard booklet with the child’s name on it: “We’re going to make our own story! Are you going to draw? Then I write. ”
  • EUREKA trick: spontaneous prompting: “What song are we going to do?” “Oh, I have a really good idea guys: let’s …” “You know that already?”
  • Have children sit when explaining something.

Part 4 – Ask questions

interactive reading

  • Pointing questions: can you point the ball?
  • Counting questions: how many balls are there?
  • Yes / no questions: is the lion on the table?
  • Who / What Questions: Who will shoot the ball? Who does the lion want to go to?
  • Why / how ?: Why does the lion want that so badly? How is the lion going to do that?
  • Contrary questions: the ball is still in the bowl (in reality the ball is somewhere else)?
  • Talk about the main problem in the story: “How is that solved?” And ask other questions about it.
  • “And how do penguins do?”
  • Ask questions about emotions: “How do you think little bear feels?” “And what is he? He is a bit sad! (imitating with tears) “
    Then you probably also know how she feels.”
  • Look expectantly at a question; what do you think would happen?
  • Also improvise some questions.
  • Predictions: what do you think will happen next?
  • What would you do if you were lost?

Part 5 – Explain difficult keywords

interactive reading

  • Explain or ask questions about what words mean (“I don’t know, do you know?”).
  • Asking questions about personal experiences with that word. For example, the word is peeking. “Have you ever peeked?”
  • Portray, for example, verbs such as peeking, and emotions. If necessary, do it first, and the child can participate.
  • To experience.
  • Show picture.
  • Talk about it.
  • To draw.
  • To hear.
  • Teaching something to someone else: retelling. This is also a valuable skill for later.
  • Sometimes you don’t have to dwell on every word and you can just paraphrase and go on.
  • Emotions can cause embarrassment. The solution: talk about feelings in the third person: “The dog is in love. What does he feel then? ‘

Part 6 – Clean up

interactive reading

  • Always talk: Is it understood? Link to own experiences.
  • Have the child retell or summarize the story.
  • Let the child earn stickers for each reading.
  • Creative processing: song, story reenactment, coloring picture, game, drawing or language game.

That was the reading tips checklist – Why is reading so important?

If you want your kids to be intelligent, read them fairytales. If you want them to be brilliant, read them more fairytales.
– Albert Einstein

  1. Reading with young children improves their brain development.
  2. It gives the child a head start.
  3. It deepens the bond between the child and the adult.
  4. Reading gives the child more self-confidence.
  5. Reading is useful before going to bed.
  6. Reading aloud stimulates the child’s imagination.
  7. Reading aloud gives the child a greater understanding of language.
  8. A young reader, read more later too!
  9. It is a lot of fun to read together.
  10. You show that you are a role model.

More about interactive reading (Article!)

interactive reading

This was the article with a checklist for interactive reading. Also take a look at the extensive article on metaphors to take your reading skills to a completely different level.

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About The Author

Rubin

Hello! Thanks for reading these articles. My intention is to make happiness as simple and clear as posssible. By the way, excuse my English. I am not a native English speaker since I live in Amsterdam. Much appreciated if you use the comments to make suggestions on my grammar. See ya in another blogpost!

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